A Warming Turmeric Cauliflower Soup For Chilly Winter Days

A Warming Turmeric Cauliflower Soup For Chilly Winter Days | Herbal Academy | There is nothing better than a warm bowl of soup on a chilly winter’s day. Give our Turmeric Cauliflower Soup a try and stay warm!

Winter is here, and if you’re anything like me, you’re probably craving soup! There is nothing better on a chilly evening, wrapped in a blanket with loved ones, than sipping from a bowl of warm, soothing soup. Turmeric (Curcuma longa) and cauliflower are gaining popularity in many healthy recipes as they have a plethora of nutritional benefits, are versatile, and are delicious. In this article, we will share the benefits of this healthy and nutritious root and vegetable pairing and offer a recipe for a warming, turmeric cauliflower soup that you can enjoy on cold winter days.

What is Turmeric?

Turmeric has been used for centuries as food and as an herb to assist with many imbalances. Its tough, fibrous root (the rhizome) is where its beneficial properties lie and give it its yellow color. Curcuma longa, whose Latin binomial comes from the Arabic name Kurkum, has also been called The Yellow One and Golden Goddess in Sanskrit (Gallant, n.d.).

Besides giving Indian curry its beautiful golden hue, turmeric has been used as a dye in packaged foods such as mustard and chicken broth (Gallant, n.d.). Turmeric can even be used as a natural, plant-based dye for fabrics like silk, cotton, and wool (Kayne, 2016).

Where wellness benefits are concerned, turmeric is most well-known for its anti-inflammatory properties (Gallant, n.d.). Turmeric is in the Zingiberaceae family, which is also home to its cousin ginger (Zingiber officinale). Turmeric is native to India (and a staple in Indian cuisine), but it can also be grown in other warm climates around the world. In ayurvedic herbalism, turmeric is commonly used to balance the doshas: vata, pitta, and kapha (Gallant, n.d.).

A Warming Turmeric Cauliflower Soup For Chilly Winter Days | Herbal Academy | There is nothing better than a warm bowl of soup on a chilly winter’s day. Give our Turmeric Cauliflower Soup a try and stay warm!

Benefits and Uses of Turmeric

As mentioned earlier, turmeric is most commonly used to assist the body when inflammation is present. It is believed that turmeric helps to inhibit an inflammatory gene by helping to lower histamine levels, subsequently increasing natural cortisone production by the adrenal glands (Rathaur, Raja, Ramteke, & John, 2012).

It has been found that turmeric can aid in health issues such as osteoarthritis (Kuptniratsaikul, Thanakhumtorn, Chinswangwatanakul, Wattanamongkonsil, & Thamlikitkul, 2009), back pain, and general inflammation (Rathaur et al., 2012), and according to a 2006 study, curcumin is also considered an antioxidant (Khor et al., 2006).

Turmeric can also benefit digestion by assisting the body in producing digestive enzymes that help the body to digest fats, thus supporting liver detoxification (Rathaur et al., 2012). While turmeric has been found safe for many to take in high amounts without side effects (Rathaur et al., 2012), some individuals can be more sensitive to turmeric so it’s best to start at the low end of a suggested dosage and slowly work up from there.

Many studies show that turmeric should be combined with black pepper to enhance the bioavailability of curcumin. Curcumin is a curcuminoid most often researched as turmeric’s primary active compound. The addition of black pepper will aid in the absorption of curcumin in the body and also facilitate the production of digestive enzymes (Shoba, 1998). Traditionally, most recipes with turmeric also include black pepper.

Curcumin is also fat-soluble, meaning that in order to obtain the benefits of the herb you should combine it with a portion of fatty food or substance. This means, if you simply put turmeric in water, you may lose out on curcumin’s benefits (Higdon, Drake, & Delage, 2005). For this reason, coconut milk is used in the recipe below.

It is also believed that turmeric should be heated in order to make the curcuminoids more bioavailable to us (Kurien & Scofield, 2009). This is likely why we most often find turmeric in traditional recipes of soups and curries.

Nutritional Benefits of Cauliflower

A Warming Turmeric Cauliflower Soup For Chilly Winter Days | Herbal Academy | There is nothing better than a warm bowl of soup on a chilly winter’s day. Give our Turmeric Cauliflower Soup a try and stay warm!

If you shop in a natural foods store, you may find that a growing number of packaged items are made of cauliflower these days, from pizza crust to mashed “potatoes” to cauliflower “rice.” The list goes on. The use of cauliflower has become very popular in the low-carb diet world as a substitution to grains or legumes making it a fantastic way to increase your vegetable intake. Cauliflower is extremely versatile; I personally enjoy it steamed, raw on a salad, or dipped in hummus. The turmeric cauliflower soup recipe below offers the option to roast and puree the cauliflower, creating a warm, creamy, and delicious soup.

Cauliflower is a wonderful dietary addition as it is widely available and affordable. It is also an excellent source of antioxidants and nutrients (Elliot, 2017). While it is low in calories, it still packs a punch with its high nutritional value and vitamin content with one serving of cauliflower containing over 75% of the recommended daily value of vitamin C (SELF Nutrition Data, 2018). According to Dr. Joseph Mercola (2014), cauliflower is a great source of vitamin K, protein, riboflavin, niacin, magnesium, phosphorus, vitamin B6, folate, pantothenic acid, potassium, and manganese. It is also high in fiber which supports healthy digestion and also aids in the detoxification process in the body (Mercola, 2014).

Cauliflower is rich in choline which plays an important role in brain health and development (Elliot, 2017). Another reason cauliflower is known to be a nutritional powerhouse is that it contains the potent antioxidant sulforaphane. Research shows that sulforaphane may also help to reduce high blood pressure and support overall heart health (Yang et al., 2015).

According to the National Cancer Institute (2012) and Abdull Razis & Noor (2013), cruciferous vegetables contain many unique antioxidants and compounds that may reduce inflammation, help protect against cancer cell growth, and even shrink existing cancer cells.

A Warming Turmeric Cauliflower Soup For Chilly Winter Days | Herbal Academy | There is nothing better than a warm bowl of soup on a chilly winter’s day. Give our Turmeric Cauliflower Soup a try and stay warm!

How To Make Turmeric Cauliflower Soup

[recipe_ingredients]

2 heads cauliflower, roughly chopped
2 medium yellow onions, diced
1 bunch carrots, chopped
3 stalks celery, chopped
1-1 ½ tablespoons fresh minced ginger (Zingiber officinale)
8-10 cloves of minced garlic (Allium sativum)
1 dried bay leaf (Laurus nobilis)
1 small bunch fresh thyme (Thymus vulgaris)
1 small bunch fresh sage (Salvia officinalis)
2 tablespoons dried ground turmeric (Curcuma longa)
1 teaspoon black pepper (Piper nigrum)
Juice from 2 large lemons
32 ounces of broth (chicken or vegetable)
32 ounce carton of unsweetened coconut milk
1 can full-fat coconut milk
½  cup gluten-free flour (King Arthur’s or Bob’s)
½ cup coconut oil
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Sea salt and pepper (to taste)
Freshly squeezed lemon juice (to taste)

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  • Cut cauliflower heads into pieces while removing large stems and toss with olive oil and salt. Roast on a sheet pan at 450 degrees F for 25 minutes or until brown.
  • On a separate sheet pan, roast carrots, celery, onion, and garlic with bay leaves, sage, and thyme at 450 degrees F.
  • While vegetables are roasting, sweat ginger (sauteed on low heat) in olive oil.  
  • Combine gluten-free flour to coconut oil to make a roux (thickening base).
  • Slowly add in the stock on low heat while whisking vigorously to make veloute (savory sauce made from a roux and stock).
  • Blend roasted cauliflower, vegetables, and ginger in a blender with coconut milk until extremely smooth.
  • Add lemon, pepper, and salt to taste and simmer for 30 minutes to an hour. Additional water or milk may be added during this process to maintain the desired thickness.

[/recipe_directions]

REFERENCES

Abdull Razis, A.F., & Noor, N.M. (2013). Cruciferous vegetables: Dietary phytochemicals for cancer prevention. Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, 14(3):1565-70.

Conrozier, T., Mathieu, P., Bonjean, M., Marc, J.F., Renevier, J.L., &  Balblanc, J.C. (2014). A complex of three natural anti-inflammatory agents provides relief of osteoarthritis pain. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, 20 Suppl 1:32-7.

Elliot, B. (2017). Top 8 health benefits of cauliflower. Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/benefits-of-cauliflower

Gallant, L. (n.d.). Turmeric: “The golden goddess.” Retrieved from http://www.ayurvedacollege.com/articles/students/turmeric

Higdon, J., Drake, V., & Delage, B. (2005). Curcumin. Retrieved from https://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/dietary-factors/phytochemicals/curcumin

Kayne, J. (2016). DIY: Dyeing with turmeric. Retrieved from https://www.jennikayne.com/ripandtan/dyeing-with-turmeric

Khor, T.O., Keum, Y.S., Lin W., Kim, J.H., Hu, R., Shen, G.,…Kong, A.N. (2006). Combined inhibitory effects of curcumin and phenethyl isothiocyanate on the growth of human PC-3 prostate xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Cancer Research, 66(2):613-21. https://doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-05-2708

Kuptniratsaikul, V., Thanakhumtorn, S., Chinswangwatanakul, P., Wattanamongkonsil, L., & Thamlikitkul, V. (2009). Efficacy and safety of Curcuma domestica extracts in patients with knee osteoarthritis. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine,15(8): 891-897. https://doi.org/10.1089/acm.2008.0186

Kurien, B.T., & Scofield, R.H. (2009). Oral administration of heat-solubilized curcumin for potentially increasing curcumin bioavailability in experimental animals. The International Journal of Cancer, 125(8): 1992-1993. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.24547

Mercola, J. (2014). Top 8 health benefits of cauliflower. Retrieved from https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/02/22/cauliflower-health-benefits.aspx

National Cancer Institute. (2012). Cruciferous vegetables and cancer prevention. Retrieved from https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/diet/cruciferous-vegetables-fact-sheet

Rathaur, P., Raja, W., Ramteke, P. W., & John, S. A. (2012). Turmeric: The golden spice of life. International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research, 3(8), 1987.

SELF Nutrition Data. (n.d.). Cauliflower, raw nutrition facts and calories. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2390/2

Shoba, G., Joy, D., Joseph, T., Majeed, M., Rajendran, R., & Srinivas, P.S. (1998). Influence of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and human volunteers. Planta Med, 64(4): 353–6. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-2006-957450

Yang, B., Xiaolu, W., Song, Z., Chunye, M., Jiuwei, C., & Yang, Z. (2015). Sulforaphane protects against cardiovascular disease via Nrf2 activation. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, 2015, 407580. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/407580

4 Fall Herbal Tea Recipes To Cozy Up With

4 Fall Herbal Tea Recipes To Cozy Up With | Herbal Academy | In this article, we're sharing four flavorful fall herbal tea recipes to cozy up with during the cooler months of the year.

It’s easy for herbalists to rejoice with the turning of fall since cooler weather invites warm tea back into our daily routine. Whether you love to cozy up with a good book and a warm mug of tea, prepare an entire nourishing quart of tea to sip throughout the day, or enjoy a simple cup of tea as part of your morning ritual, herbal tea is a fall staple. In this article, I’m sharing four fresh, new, and flavorful fall herbal tea recipes to cozy up with soon.

4 Fall Herbal Tea Recipes To Cozy Up With

1. Vanilla Rooibos

The first of my fall herbal tea recipes is an herbal twist on a classic fall favorite. This vanilla rooibos herbal tea recipe brings in a couple new and tasty ingredients with no artificial or natural flavorings. The immune-boosting, floral aromatic of the elderflower (Sambucus nigra) is a surprisingly wonderful pairing with the naturally energizing and tannic red rooibos (Aspalathus linearis), (Hoffmann, 2003). The lightly toasted coconut flavor with the subtle sweetness of the vanilla (Vanilla spp.) extract makes for a delightful tea to cozy up with this fall.

Vanilla Rooibos

[recipe_ingredients]

1 teaspoon red rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) leaves
½ teaspoon vanilla (Vanilla spp.) extract or powder
1 teaspoon dried elder (Sambucus nigra) flower
1 teaspoon toasted shredded coconut
1 cup of freshly boiled water

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  • Add the rooibos, elderflower, and coconut together in a tea strainer over a heat-safe container.
  • Pour freshly boiled water over dry ingredients and allow to steep for about 10 minutes.
  • Strain the ingredients from the tea then stir in the vanilla extract. Sweeten if desired.
  • Enjoy!

[/recipe_directions]

2. Goddess Drink

The next of my fall herbal tea recipes was spontaneously created years ago, and I jokingly called in my “goddess drink” since it felt so nourishing to yin energies and the entire quality of the tea reminded me of something a goddess herself would regularly drink. The name stuck, and the tea continues to provide a sense of “goddess-like” nourishment to all who have enjoyed it. White peony (Paeonia lactiflora) root and shatavari (Asparagus racemosus) root are both classic tonics for the female reproductive system while carrying a neutral flavor. The aromatic from the rose (Rosa spp.) buds offers a subtle floral note and a heart-relaxing effect while the nut milk creates a delightful creaminess.

Goddess Drink

[recipe_ingredients]

1 tablespoon dried white peony (Paeonia lactiflora) root
1 tablespoon dried shatavari (Asparagus racemosus) root
3-5 dried rose (Rosa spp.) buds
2 cups water
Cashew or coconut milk
Raw honey to taste

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  • Add the water, peony root, and shatavari root to a small pot and place on the stove over high heat. Bring the mixture to a boil then cover with a lid, reduce the heat to low, and simmer for about 40 minutes.
  • Turn off the stove and remove the pot from the hot burner. Immediately add the rose buds to the pot of tea and cover with the lid. Allow the rose buds to infuse for about 5 minutes.
  • Strain all of the herbs from the tea and pour into a heat-safe container. Add a splash of cashew or coconut milk and raw honey to taste (depending on how sweet you like your tea to taste).
  • Relax, sip, and feel nourished.

[/recipe_directions]

4 Fall Herbal Tea Recipes To Cozy Up With | Herbal Academy | In this article, we're sharing four flavorful fall herbal tea recipes to cozy up with during the cooler months of the year.

3. Tulsi Sunrise

Another of my favorite fall herbal tea recipes is this part sweet, part spicy golden tea that truly feels like a warm cup of sunshine on a cool fall day. Tulsi (Ocimum tenuiflorum) is considered a mild adaptogenic herb, helping boost our body’s ability to both defend against and adapt to the effects of stress (Hoffmann, 2003), making it an ideal herb to draw from as you transition seasons and in the morning to set the tone for the day ahead. The remaining herbs lend an inflammation-soothing, antioxidant-rich, and flavorful complement to the tulsi base. Feel free to play with the amount of lemon juice and honey you add depending on the amount of sour versus sweet you prefer.

Tulsi Sunrise

[recipe_ingredients]

1 teaspoon dried tulsi (Ocimum tenuiflorum) aerial parts
¼ teaspoon turmeric (Curcuma longa) root powder
½ teaspoon dried lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) aerial parts
¼ teaspoon dried ginger (Zingiber officinalis) root
½ teaspoon dried orange (Citrus x aurantium var. sinensis) peel
1 cup freshly boiled water
½ teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
Raw honey to taste

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  • Add the tulsi, turmeric, lemongrass, ginger, and orange peel into a tea bag and place in a heat-safe container.
  • Pour the freshly boiled water over the tea bag and allow to steep for about 10 minutes.
  • Squeeze the excess tea from the tea bag and remove it from the mug.
  • Add lemon juice and raw honey to taste. Stir well to combine.
  • Sip and enjoy!

[/recipe_directions]

4. Cinnamon Oats

Sometimes a simple trio of herbs is all you need to make a delicious tea perfect to cozy up with this fall. The last of my fall herbal tea recipes combines cinnamon (Cinnamomum spp.) and oatstraw (Avena sativa) — two of my go-to “comfort” herbs for their naturally sweet and soothing aromatics and flavors. This tea replicates the warming, cozy feeling of preparing a steaming bowl of oatmeal on a crisp fall day. Oatstraw is a wonderful herb to nourish the nervous system while the cinnamon chips provide a warming, circulatory boost (Hoffmann, 2003). Adding a pinch of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root helps tie the two together with a touch of sweetness.

Cinnamon Oats

[recipe_ingredients]

½ teaspoon cinnamon (Cinnamomum spp.) chips
1 tablespoon oatstraw (Avena sativa) leaf and stem
A “pinch” (about ~⅛ teaspoon) shredded licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root
1 cup freshly boiled water

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  • Add all of the herbs in a tea strainer and place in a heat-safe container.
  • Pour freshly boiled water over the herbs and allow to steep for about 10 minutes.
  • Strain, sweeten if desired, sip, and enjoy!

[/recipe_directions]

Time To Start Brewing

After learning 4 new fall herbal tea recipes to cozy up with, now it’s time to start brewing in the kitchen! Curious to learn more about which herbs are great to use during fall? Read my post on 5 Herbs To Help You Transition Seasons From Summer To Fall.

4 Fall Herbal Tea Recipes To Cozy Up With | Herbal Academy | In this article, we're sharing four flavorful fall herbal tea recipes to cozy up with during the cooler months of the year.

REFERENCES

Hoffmann, D. (2003). Medical herbalism. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press.

Sunbutter Cookies: A Tasty Treat

Sunbutter Cookies: A Tasty Treat | Herbal Academy | Are you looking for a simple and healthy winter treat? We have just the recipe for you! Try these tasty Sunbutter Cookies today!

Full disclosure. This cookie recipe was born out of my own laziness. While living in San Francisco, I was lounging on my couch one foggy afternoon, dreaming of fresh baked cookies. The only problem was that I was feeling too cheap and lackadaisical to go to any great lengths to procure baked goods that required much thought or effort. Any recipe that needed more than one step and a few simple ingredients was out of the question. I also wanted something relatively wholesome—no yuck ingredients, such as white sugar or bleached flour for my cookies!

Like all good San Franciscans, I turned to my smartphone for an answer. I don’t remember exactly what I typed into my keyword search, but it was something to the effect of “really easy cookie recipe” or “cookies for really lazy people.”

The recipe that caught my eye was a three-ingredient peanut butter cookie recipe. This three-ingredient peanut butter cookie recipe eventually morphed into a slightly more wholesome sunbutter cookies recipe, replacing peanut butter with sunflower seed butter and cane sugar with coconut sugar. I have made variations of this cookie recipe at least a dozen times, and no matter how I seem to tweak and refine, the results are always stunningly delicious and satisfying, yet not overly sweet.

Sunbutter Cookies: A Tasty Treat | Herbal Academy | Are you looking for a simple and healthy winter treat? We have just the recipe for you! Try these tasty Sunbutter Cookies today!

These sunbutter cookies are best described as delicious little seed butter patties. They have a distinctive nuttiness and are just sweet enough. Though I don’t advise eating cookies for breakfast every day, a couple of these cookies and a spicy cup of chai tea can make a great breakfast on occasion. Sunbutter cookies are also a real crowd pleaser—they are a favorite at potlucks and holiday cookie parties. They are also flourless, which goes over well with the gluten-free crowd. Above all, they are not only tasty, but incredibly easy to make.

Here I will share both my classic recipe, as well as a couple of riffs that I have found to be as delightful as the original. It is also important to note that peanut butter or sunflower seed butter can be used for all of these recipes. Since I am an Ayurvedic practitioner, I generally choose sunbutter over peanut butter because peanuts are considered to be disruptive to all three doshas (constitutional types), and sunflower butter is less hot, dry, and heavy as compared to peanut butter. However, I have used peanut butter on occasion, and I must say that either choice yields delicious results.

Sunbutter Cookies: A Tasty Treat | Herbal Academy | Are you looking for a simple and healthy winter treat? We have just the recipe for you! Try these tasty Sunbutter Cookies today!

Sunbutter Cookies: A Tasty Winter Treat

Greta's Sunbutter Cookie Classic

[recipe_ingredients]

16 ounces sunflower seed butter (unsweetened)
2 eggs
1 1/2 cups coconut sugar
a dash of each: dried ginger, cinnamon, cardamom
2 tablespoons molasses (optional)

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Combine all ingredients in a mixing bowl until smooth. Grease a cookie sheet (I like to use ghee or coconut oil for this). Bake for 7-8 minutes. Do not over bake!
  • Let cool and then enjoy! The cooling off period is crucial. The cookies obtain a more creamy, satisfyingly dense consistency after sitting for several hours. This also means that they keep well for a day or two!  
  • More words born out of experience: while seven to eight minutes in the oven doesn’t seem like much, the short bake time is vital to the recipe. If you let the cookies bake just until they are slightly golden on the edges and then let them cool, the result is a fabulous nutty, creamy texture.

[/recipe_directions]

I can attest to the above recipe being tried and true. However, I have also experimented with a few variations on this theme that I have found to be equally delicious. Here are those variations:

Give it an Herbal Boost!

Sunbutter Cookies: A Tasty Treat | Herbal Academy | Are you looking for a simple and healthy winter treat? We have just the recipe for you! Try these tasty Sunbutter Cookies today!

Give these sunbutter cookies an herbal edge! Try adding herbal adaptogens such as powdered ashwagandha, shatavari, or kapikacchu to the mix. I got this idea after attending a holiday herb talk in Asheville, North Carolina given by Asia Suler of One Willow Apothecaries. She shared her adaptogenic cookie recipe (as well as some samples) with the attendees. I was so inspired by the concept of adding stress-busting herbs to holiday cookies, I figured I would try this trick with my own recipe.

I have experimented with adding a few different adaptogens and find that I don’t notice a significant change in flavor, but I take comfort in knowing that I am getting a little extra fortification. I recommend adding no more than a two tablespoons total of powdered herbs, and any combination of adaptogenic, tonifying herbs will do. (This category of herbs is referred to as rasayanas in Ayurveda). Nothing else in the recipe needs to change. Follow all other directions as given above. Kapikacchu (Mucuna pruriens), ashwaganda (Withania somnifera), shatavari (Asparagus racemosus), and eleuthero (Eleutherococcus senticosus) are nice for their innocuous flavor. Ginseng powder adds a little more of a bite.

Everything’s Better with Chocolate Chips!

In this variation, I add chocolate chips because, well, everything’s better with chocolate! Since the chocolate chips add a little more sweetness, I subtract a half cup of sugar from this recipe. Chocolate chips provide a bit more flavor accent and texture, and satisfy anyone’s chocolate craving.

Greta's Sunbutter Cookie with Chocolate Chips

[recipe_ingredients]

16 ounces sunflower butter (unsweetened)
2 eggs
1 cup coconut sugar
3/4 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips
1 tablespoon molasses (optional)
a dash of cinnamon, ginger, and cardamom

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Combine all ingredients in a mixing bowl until smooth. Grease a cookie sheet (I like to use ghee or coconut oil for this). Bake for 7-8 minutes at 350. Do not over bake!
  • Let cool and enjoy! The cooling off period is crucial. The cookies obtain a more creamy, satisfyingly dense consistency after sitting for several hours. This also means that they keep well for a day or two!  
  • More words born out of experience: while seven to eight minutes in the oven doesn’t seem like much, the short bake time is vital to the recipe. If you let the cookies bake just until they are slightly golden on the edges, and then let them cool, the result is a fabulous nutty, creamy texture.  

[/recipe_directions]

Add Oats!

Sunbutter Cookies: A Tasty Treat | Herbal Academy | Are you looking for a simple and healthy winter treat? We have just the recipe for you! Try these tasty Sunbutter Cookies today!

True, this recipe is a bit aberrant from my classic Sunbutter Cookies recipe. Here I add oats and a little coconut oil to counteract the dryness of the raw oats. The oats add texture and a bit of that oatmeal cookie comfort, but you get the same nutty satisfaction from the peanut butter. I have only made this recipe with peanut butter to date, but I imagine sunflower butter would do just as well.

Greta's Sunbutter Cookie with Oats

[recipe_ingredients]

16 ounces organic crunchy peanut butter (unsweetened)
2 eggs
1 cup coconut sugar
1 cup raw rolled oats
2 tablespoons coconut oil

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine all ingredients in a mixing bowl until smooth. Grease a cookie sheet (I like to use ghee or coconut oil for this). Bake for 7-8 minutes at 350 degrees F. Do not over bake!
  • Let cool and enjoy! The cooling off period is crucial. The cookies obtain a more creamy, satisfyingly dense consistency after sitting for several hours. This also means that they keep well for a day or two!  
  • More words born out of experience: while seven to eight minutes in the oven doesn’t seem like much, the short bake time is vital to the recipe. If you let the cookies bake just until they are slightly golden on the edges, and then let them cool, the result is a fabulous nutty, creamy texture. Follow the exact same baking instructions as the original recipe.  

[/recipe_directions]

Whether it’s the classic recipe or a variation thereof, I find that these cookies really hit the spot when I am craving a little hassle-free holiday cookie baking. They also make a lovely homemade gift or contribution to a holiday spread. Or, follow my example and enjoy these wholesome treats for breakfast any time of year! No recipe could be easier. Bon appetit!

Sunbutter Cookies: A Tasty Treat | Herbal Academy | Are you looking for a simple and healthy winter treat? We have just the recipe for you! Try these tasty Sunbutter Cookies today!

12 Herbal Thanksgiving Dinner Recipes For This Year’s Celebrations

12 Herbal Thanksgiving Dinner Recipes For This Year’s Celebrations | Herbal Academy | Are you looking for ways to spice up your Thanksgiving dinner this year? We have 12 Thanksgiving dinner recipes for you that incorporate 17 different herbs!

Thanksgiving is just around the corner, and we’re all planning our big meals. If I asked you to name a few herbs or spices you might be using in your Thanksgiving recipes, sage and cinnamon would undoubtedly be at the top of the list. But there are many other herbs that can be used in creative ways to spice up your Thanksgiving Dinner this year.

Below I’ll share 17 common herbs that are often found in Thanksgiving dishes and a variety of delicious Thanksgiving food recipes that incorporate them!

17 Herbs Commonly Found In Thanksgiving Dishes

12 Herbal Thanksgiving Dinner Recipes For This Year’s Celebrations | Herbal Academy | Are you looking for ways to spice up your Thanksgiving dinner this year? We have 12 Thanksgiving dinner recipes for you that incorporate 17 different herbs!

Herbs and spices are an integral part of the recipes we commonly associate with this time of year. The reasons for their use go beyond flavor to their other beneficial effects on the body, especially at Thanksgiving when overeating is easy.

The following is a list of 17 herbs that are commonly found in Thanksgiving dishes, and a brief note on their beneficial properties. Many of these herbs stimulate circulation in the digestive tract to build digestive warmth and stimulate the release of digestive enzymes and bile, increasing absorption of the nutrients. Due to their aromatic oil content, they act as carminatives to ease spasm and gas and soothe digestive discomforts. The bitter component contained in some of these herbs also promotes digestion and nutrient absorption.

1. Sage (Salvia officinalis)

Sage is an aromatic, bitter herb which stimulates digestion. It is used to soothe indigestion and gas and temper bad breath (Mars, 2007).

2. Parsley (Petroselinum crispum)

Parsley has been long known as an aid for bad breath, but it also is a nervine and good for digestion (Mars, 2007).

3. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)

Rosemary for remembrance” is a common saying and the herb can be helpful for memory problems. It also improves circulation and digestion, and is tonic for the nervous system (Mars, 2007).

4. Thyme (Thymus vulgaris)

Thyme is a useful herb to add to the Thanksgiving meal. Not only is it antispasmodic, and therefore, helps with digestion, but it’s also antibacterial and antiseptic. It also relaxes the respiratory tract, which can help with coughs (Castleman, 2003).

5. Cinnamon (Cinnamomum aromaticum or C. zeylanicum)

It’s thought that cinnamon has been used since 2700 B.C. (Castleman, 2003). Cinnamon is warming, stimulates digestion, and is thought to be active against both staph and botulism bacteria (Mars, 2007).

6. Tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus)

The light taste of licorice-flavored tarragon is used as an appetite stimulant and aids digestion (Castleman, 2003), as it stimulates production of digestive juices.

7. Juniper Berries (Juniperus communis)

The bitter taste of juniper berries stimulates the release of digestive juices, aiding the digestive process (Kress, 2005).

8. Marjoram (Origanum majorana)

Known as a mild oregano, marjoram can assist with digestion, toothaches, and inflammation (Kowalchik, Hylton, & Carr, 1998).

12 Herbal Thanksgiving Dinner Recipes For This Year’s Celebrations | Herbal Academy | Are you looking for ways to spice up your Thanksgiving dinner this year? We have 12 Thanksgiving dinner recipes for you that incorporate 17 different herbs!

9. Savory (Satureja spp.)

Mostly used as a culinary herb today, savory has been used for minor stomach upsets in the past (Kowalchik, Hylton, & Carr, 1998).

10. Cloves (Syzygium aromaticum)

A warming spice, clove stimulates both circulation and digestion. It has been used with diarrhea and may be effective against Enterococcus coli (Mars, 2007).

11. Ginger (Zingiber officinale)

Ginger has long been known as the “go to” spice for nausea and motion sickness. Its warming, stimulating nature is also good for digestion and bloating. The dried plant is hotter than the fresh (Mars, 2007).

12. Allspice (Pimenta dioica)

Another warming spice, allspice has been used for poor appetite, indigestion, and gas (Mars, 2007).

13. Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum)

A warming carminative, cardamom has been known for reducing stomach acidity, gas, and indigestion (Mars, 2007).

14. Coriander (Coriandrum sativum)

Coriander stimulates digestion and helps with bloating, poor digestion and appetite loss (Mars, 2007); while many of the herbs and spices listed here are warming carminatives, coriander is an example of a cooling carminative.

15. Nutmeg (Myristica fragrans)

Nutmeg seems to stimulate brain activity and circulation but has also been used for indigestion, insomnia, and muscle pain (Mars, 2007). Its warming, carminative actions and slight bitter taste aid digestion.

16. Bay Leaf (Laurus nobilis)

Bay leaf tonifies the digestive system, thereby aiding digestion and helping ease gas. It has been known to aid those with arthritis and may be of benefit when added to a bath for sore muscles (Mars, 2007).

17. Pepper (Piper nigrum)

Pepper is warming and stimulating and is known to improve circulation. It has also been used for arthritis, nausea, vertigo, and indigestion (Mars, 2007).

Herbal Thanksgiving Dinner Recipes To Try

12 Herbal Thanksgiving Dinner Recipes For This Year’s Celebrations | Herbal Academy | Are you looking for ways to spice up your Thanksgiving dinner this year? We have 12 Thanksgiving dinner recipes for you that incorporate 17 different herbs!

Thanksgiving dinner is often made up of traditional recipes that have been passed down from generation to generation, but if you’re looking to try something new or incorporate herbs into more of your meals, the following recipes can help you do just that. Here you’ll find several herbal Thanksgiving recipes that feature some of the herbs mentioned above.

Stuffing

Stuffing is a traditional savory side dish at most Thanksgiving dinners, whether you are using it to stuff a turkey or baking it separately. This recipe allows you to add more herbs if you would like to bump up the savory herbal flavor. We like the sage, thyme, and pepper combination, but feel free to use any extras from the list above.

Basic Bread Stuffing

[recipe_ingredients]

¾ cup minced onion
1 ½  cups chopped celery
1 cup butter
9 cups soft bread pieces ripped up into small pieces (about an inch square)
2 teaspoons salt
1 ½ teaspoon crushed sage leaves
1 teaspoon thyme
½ teaspoon pepper

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  1. In a large skillet, cook onion and celery in butter until they are tender. Stir in one third of the bread. Place this mixture into a large bowl, and add the remaining ingredients. Toss well. Stuff turkey just prior to baking. Alternatively, place stuffing in a glass casserole dish and heat for 45 minutes at 350 degrees, until heated through and a little crispy on top.

[/recipe_directions]

Brines

Brining turkeys has become popular around Wisconsin. Brining is done by adding your choice of herbs to salt and water. You place the whole bird in a large vessel (it must be completely covered) and add your herbs. The brine is like a marinade, and the turkey must sit in the water mixture for 24 hours before removing, rinsing (if you choose), and baking. Brining locks in the moisture of the bird and makes it juicy and more flavorful. I have found stabbing the meat of the bird a few times with a fork before putting it in the brine allows the flavor of the brine to better penetrate the meat.

12 Herbal Thanksgiving Dinner Recipes For This Year’s Celebrations | Herbal Academy | Are you looking for ways to spice up your Thanksgiving dinner this year? We have 12 Thanksgiving dinner recipes for you that incorporate 17 different herbs!

Basic Turkey Brine (Garfunkel Four)

[recipe_ingredients]

Vegetable broth to cover the turkey
1 cup sea salt (any salt will do)
2 tablespoons dried parsley (I use Italian flat leaf parsley since I feel it is more flavorful)
2 tablespoons dried sage
2 tablespoons dried rosemary
2 tablespoon dried thyme

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  1. Mix all ingredients and place the turkey in the liquid, ensuring it is completely covered. Cover the pan and refrigerate for 24 hours.
  2. After brining, remove the turkey and rinse (if you choose – or not) and then bake as you normally would.

[/recipe_directions]

Juniper Berry Brine

[recipe_ingredients]

1 gallon water (or enough to cover the turkey)
7 dried bay leaves
3 tablespoons dried juniper berries
1 ½ cups coarse salt
2 tablespoons coriander seeds
2 tablespoons peppercorns
1 bottle of the white wine of your choice (example: White Zinfandel Riesling)

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  1. Place the turkey in the water with all the other ingredients, ensuring it is covered. Cover the pan and refrigerate for 24 hours.
  2. After brining, remove the turkey and rinse (if you choose) and then bake as you normally would.

[/recipe_directions]

Allium Brine

[recipe_ingredients]

1 gallon water (or enough to cover the turkey)
1 ½ cups sea salt (any salt will do)
3 medium onions (any color you prefer)
10 garlic cloves (more if you like garlic, less if you don’t)
1 or 2 bunches (as your taste buds dictate) of one of the following: fresh thyme, parsley, rosemary, savory, or sage

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  1. Place the turkey in the water with all the other ingredients, ensuring it is covered. Cover the pan and refrigerate for 24 hours.
  2. After brining, remove the turkey and rinse (if you choose) and then bake as you normally would.

[/recipe_directions]

Rubs

Another popular alternative to the traditional baking is to use a savory herbal rub for the turkey. Rubs should be applied on and under the skin to make the turkey absorb them easier. If you make the rub a day in advance (stored in the refrigerator until ready to use), it allows the flavors to mix.Rubs can also double as a baste. After you have mixed the rub blend, divide it in two parts—one for the rub and one for the baste (this way during basting you won’t use the rub that has come into contact with raw poultry).

Dried Herb Rub

[recipe_ingredients]

¼ cup olive oil
1 teaspoon. dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried rosemary
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon. ground black pepper
1 teaspoon. dried tarragon
1 medium onion and 1 quartered lemon (optional—for inside of bird’s cavities)

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  1. When thoroughly mixed, rub into turkey skin, under skin, and into cavities.
  2. Bake as normal or per instructions that came with turkey.

[/recipe_directions]

12 Herbal Thanksgiving Dinner Recipes For This Year’s Celebrations | Herbal Academy | Are you looking for ways to spice up your Thanksgiving dinner this year? We have 12 Thanksgiving dinner recipes for you that incorporate 17 different herbs!

Fresh Herb Rub

[recipe_ingredients]

1 heaping tablespoon fresh rosemary, finely chopped
1 heaping tablespoon fresh thyme, finely chopped
1 heaping tablespoon minced garlic
1 heaping tablespoon minced onion
2 teaspoons fresh sage, finely chopped
3 teaspoons salt (your choice)
⅓  cup olive oil
1 tablespoon any white wine
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  1. Mix all ingredients well. Wash the turkey and pat dry. Rub the mixture all over the turkey, including under the skin if possible.
  2. Bake as normal or per instructions that came with turkey.

[/recipe_directions]

Poultry Seasoning

If you would like to make your own poultry seasoning, here are a couple recipes to try. When using dried herbs, these recipes double and triple, if you would like to make a larger quantity to have on hand or give as gifts.. All rubs made with dried herbs can be stored in labeled, airtight containers.

Poultry Seasoning #1

[recipe_ingredients]

2 ½ teaspoons dried sage
1 ½ teaspoons dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried marjoram
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
¼ teaspoon dried nutmeg
1 teaspoon dried pepper

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  1. Mix all ingredients together.
  2. Thoroughly season by shaking this mixture evenly over the chicken and bake as directed.

[/recipe_directions]

Basic Poultry Seasoning #2

[recipe_ingredients]

1 teaspoon dried sage
½ teaspoon dried thyme
¾ teaspoon dried pepper
Dash of clove (optional)

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  1. Mix all ingredients together.
  2. Thoroughly season by shaking this mixture evenly over the chicken and bake as directed.

[/recipe_directions]

Desserts

So far, we have primarily used herbs for the savory part of our Thanksgiving dinner. Now onto the desserts and sides which are usually heavily flavored with warming, toasty spices like cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and cardamom.

Pumpkin Bread

While some of the beloved recipes in our family traditions were rather enthusiastic in their use of sugar and fat, enjoying them as a special treat for holidays is just fine. If you are looking to minimize sugar and oil, you may want to try this pumpkin bread recipe.

Pumpkin Bread

[recipe_ingredients]

3 cups sugar
1 cup oil
4 eggs (2 at a time)
2 cups pumpkin
3 ½ cups flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
½ teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon ground cloves

Note: Sugar can be reduced to 2 cups, but this will slightly alter the texture of the bread.

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  1. Combine wet ingredients in one bowl and mix well. In another bowl, combine dry ingredients and mix well.
  2. Slowly blend dry ingredients into wet ingredients, adding an additional 2/3 cup water, and blend well.
  3. Bake in loaf pans at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes.

[/recipe_directions]

A traditional Thanksgiving dessert is apple pie or pumpkin pie, and you can easily make your own spice combinations to use in holiday dessert recipes. All recipes can be adapted to your personal tastes and multiplied for bigger batches. You can make these in bulk and put them in cute jars to give as Christmas presents.

DIY Apple Pie Seasoning

[recipe_ingredients]

2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
1 tablespoons ground nutmeg
1 ½ teaspoons ground allspice
1 ½ teaspoons ground cardamom

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  1. Mix all ingredients together. Makes about a quarter cup. Keep the extra in an airtight container to use again.

[/recipe_directions]

DIY Pumpkin Pie Seasoning #1

[recipe_ingredients]

3 tablespoons ground cinnamon
2 ½ teaspoons ground ginger
2 teaspoons ground allspice
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 ½ teaspoon ground cloves

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  1. Mix all ingredients together. Makes about a quarter cup. Keep the extra in an airtight container to use again.

[/recipe_directions]

DIY Pumpkin Pie Seasoning #2

[recipe_ingredients]

4 teaspoons ground cinnamon
2 ½ teaspoons ground ginger
1 ½ teaspoons ground cloves
½ teaspoon ground nutmeg

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  1. Mix all ingredients together. Makes about a quarter cup. Keep the extra in an airtight container to use again.

[/recipe_directions]

These ideas and recipes are just a place for you to begin experimenting with herbs and spices around the holidays. Feel free to make additions, deletions, or substitutions in any of these recipes to tweak them to your own preferences. Enjoy cooking with herbs and spices and getting the benefits they offer for our wellness, digestive and otherwise!

12 Herbal Thanksgiving Dinner Recipes For This Year’s Celebrations | Herbal Academy | Are you looking for ways to spice up your Thanksgiving dinner this year? We have 12 Thanksgiving dinner recipes for you that incorporate 17 different herbs!

REFERENCES

Castleman, M. (2003). The new healing herbs: The classic guide to nature’s best medicines featuring the top 100 time-tested herbs. Dingley, VIC: Hinkler Books.

Mars, B. (2007). The desktop guide to herbal medicine: The ultimate multidisciplinary reference to the amazing realm of healing plants, in a quick-study, one-stop guide. Columbus, OH: Basic Health Publications, Inc.

Kowalchik, C., Hylton, W., & Carr, A. (1998). Rodales illustrated encyclopedia of herbs. Emmaus, PA: Rodale Press.

Kress, H. (2005). Using juniper berries. Retrieved from https://www.henriettes-herb.com/blog/using-juniper-berries.html

DIY Herbal Pet Shampoo and Rinse for Healthy Skin & Fur

DIY Herbal Pet Shampoo and Rinse for Healthy Skin & Fur | Herbal Academy | To help keep your furry friends clean and healthy, here's a simple herbal pet shampoo and rinse to help maintain a healthy coat!

As the ground begins to thaw, we will be spending more time outdoors with our pets enjoying the warmth of early spring.  And, just like us, our pets will be transitioning from the dryness of winter to the freshness of spring. Since different seasons have different effects on skin, pet owners should be aware of any changes in their pets’ skin, fur, and coat. To help keep your furry friends clean and healthy, you can rely on this simple herbal dry shampoo and rinse to help maintain a healthy coat.

Important Research and Safety Measures

When it comes to do-it-yourself pet care products, there are two important things to consider:

  1. Proper research regarding ingredients that are pet-safe.
  2. Your intimate knowledge of your pet or pets.

All of the herbs listed for use in the recipes below are considered pet-safe; however, if your dog or cat has specific allergies or sensitivities, their individual needs should always be the top consideration when creating any pet shampoo or rinse. If you have any questions, consult your veterinarian.

Seasonal Concerns

While in the summer your pet might need a deep cleanse or flea treatment, wintertime pets can suffer from dry and itchy skin that requires soothing and hydration.

Now that the weather is finally starting to warm, why not freshen up your pets as part of your spring cleaning rituals. Although both of these recipes are gentle enough for use all year round, remember that cold-weather baths should be limited since over-washing can lead to further dryness and irritation.

According to the ASPCA, “bathing your pets too often can remove necessary oils from their skin and fur, and can increase the chance of skin irritation. Bathe your pets as little as possible during cold snaps” (“Winter Is Here,” 2014). Since we are not quite out of the cold yet, proceed with caution.

DIY Herbal Pet Shampoo and Rinse for Healthy Skin & Fur | Herbal Academy | To help keep your furry friends clean and healthy, here's a simple herbal pet shampoo and rinse to help maintain a healthy coat!

Why You Should Make Your Own Herbal Pet Shampoo

Most conventional pet care products on the market, including shampoos and rinses, contain questionable ingredients, including those that you would not put on yourself or your family. Ingredients such as polyethylene glycol (PEG), sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), and sodium laureth sulfate (SLES) can cause skin irritation, eye issues, itching, dryness, and diarrhea in animals (Leonardi, 2012). Parabens and other preservatives are a no-no for pets and the planet, so going green is good for everyone.

Herbal Dry Shampoo

Adapted from Herbal Dry Shampoo by Jan Berry
Yield ¼ cup herbal dry shampoo

This recipe is great to use in between water baths to help freshen your pet’s coat without over drying it. It can be used refresh smelly fur and to help soothe itchy, irritated skin on cats and dogs.

[recipe_ingredients]

1 tablespoon dried lavender flowers
¼ teaspoon neem* powder (finely powdered dried oxeye daisy flowers may be used instead)
¼ cup arrowroot powder

[/recipe_ingredients]

[recipe_directions]

  • Using electric coffee grinder or mortar and pestle, grind lavender flowers to fine powder.
  • Mix lavender powder with neem and arrowroot powders until thoroughly mixed.
  • Store finished dry shampoo in a tightly sealed jar.

Scoop or grab a handful and rub a small amount all over your dog’s or cat’s fur. Avoid the face and eyes. Brush thoroughly. Although, this can be vacuumed up easily indoors, it can get messy, so you might want to do this outside on a nice day. If you are creating an herbal dry shampoo for cats, you can also include or substitute dried catnip or goldenseal (Baker, 2013).

* Neem should not be used on/by pregnant or nursing animals or humans.

[/recipe_directions]

Soothing Spring Herbal Skin Rinse

Adapted from Itchy Skin Rinse by Jan Berry
Yield 2 ½ cups

This post-bath herbal itchy skin rinse was developed with dogs in mind and is not intended for use on your feline friends.

[recipe_ingredients]

1 ½ cups apple cider vinegar
1 cup warm water
Fresh dill
Calendula flowers (fresh or dried)
Yarrow (fresh or dried)
Lavender (fresh or dried)
Rose petals and leaves (fresh or dried)

[/recipe_ingredients]

[recipe_directions]

  • Heat apple cider vinegar to a gentle simmer.
  • Meanwhile, fill a 1 quart canning jar halfway with the herbs and flowers. Fresh dill is preferred, although dried may be used if that is all that is available to you.  
  • Cover the herbs and flowers with the hot apple cider vinegar.
  • Let cool, then strain into a large bowl or pitcher.
  • Add the warm water to the infused apple cider vinegar.
  • Pour the mixture over your dog as the final rinse of their bath.

Note: When using any shampoo or rinse on your pets, take care not to get any near their face, eyes, or ears as even the gentlest formula can cause irritation.

[/recipe_directions]

DIY Herbal Pet Shampoo and Rinse for Healthy Skin & Fur | Herbal Academy | To help keep your furry friends clean and healthy, here's a simple herbal pet shampoo and rinse to help maintain a healthy coat!

Pet-Safe Herbs

The herbal skin rinse recipe above contains beneficial dog-friendly herbs. Dill contains limonene, which has been known to have flea-killing properties. Rose, lavender, and Calendula can help calm irritation and reduce inflammation (Berry, 2016). Calendula has also been shown to help with itchiness and minor abrasions (Berry, 2016) due to its antiseptic and antifungal qualities (Khalsa, 2015). Yarrow also possesses antiseptic qualities that can help with scratches or raw spots on your dog’s skin (Berry, 2016).

If you want to try a variation on the recipe above, you could infuse the herbal rinse with peppermint for itch relief (Tilford & Wulff, 2009) or rosemary to help make your dog’s coat nice and shiny (Safe Herbs for Dogs, n.d.). Rosemary is a great addition to the herbal rinse as it brings out the natural luster and tones in your dog’s fur and helps promote hair growth (Khalsa, 2015, p. 86).

For itching accompanied by redness, a cooled rinse of chamomile, plantain, and Calendula tea may be applied to dogs or cats (Tilford & Wulff, 2009). Chamomile can help soothe skin rashes and increase wound healing, plus it is particularly useful for itchy allergic dogs (Khalsa, 2015)

In addition to those listed, other pet-friendly herbs include basil, lemongrass, lemon balm, turmeric, spearmint, nettle, and oregano (Shipman, 2015), as well as aloe, dandelion, Echinacea, fennel, parsley, sage, and thyme (Khalsa, 2015). Although the herbs listed here are all considered safe for dogs, not all are suitable for apple cider vinegar infusion. Read more information about infusions in A Deeper Look at Herbal Infusions.

Since there are so many problematic ingredients in commercial pet care products, making your own herbal creations is a healthy and safe alternative. That way you know exactly ingredients are going into the shampoo or rinse, and exactly what is going on your beloved pet.

Want to learn about natural first aid for your furry friends? Keep reading for more information on herbal remedies!

DIY Herbal Pet Shampoo and Rinse for Healthy Skin & Fur | Herbal Academy | To help keep your furry friends clean and healthy, here's a simple herbal pet shampoo and rinse to help maintain a healthy coat!

REFERENCES

Baker, Karen (2013, December 4). Herbs: A Simple “Green” Way to Help Boost Your Cat’s Health and Happiness. Retrieved on January 19, 2017 from http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2013/12/04/growing-cat-friendly-herbs.aspx

Berry, Jan (2016). 101 Easy homemade products for your skin, health & home. Salem, MA: Page Street Publishing.

Khalsa, Deva, VMD (2015), Dr. Khalsa’s natural dog. Irvine, CA: i-5 Publishing.

Leonardi, L. (2012, April 20). Natural and Homemade Shampoo for Dogs. Retrieved January 4, 2017, from https://www.petcarerx.com/article/natural-and-homemade-shampoo-for-dogs/199

Safe Herbs for Dogs: An Index. (2017). Natural Dog Health Remedies. Retrieved on January 6, 2017 from http://www.natural-dog-health-remedies.com/safe-herbs-for-dogs.html

Shipman, J. (2015, April 10). Safe and Beneficial Herbs for Dogs. Retrieved January 10, 2017, from http://www.beaglesandbargains.com/herbs-safe-beneficial-for-dogs/

Tilford, Gregory J. and Wulff, Mary L. (2009). Herbs for pets: The natural way to enhance your pet’s life. Irvine, CA: Bow Ties Press.

Winter Is Here! Protect Your Pets This Season with These Tips. (2014, December 30). Retrieved January 5, 2017, from http://www.aspca.org/news/winter-here-protect-your-pets-season-these-tips

What Exactly Are “Parts” in Herbal Recipes?

What Exactly Are “Parts” in Herbal Recipes? | Herbal Academy | Using parts in herbal recipes as a measurement really is a simple way to enjoy herbs, allowing for flexibility and ease in herbal crafting!

In the sleepy morning hours, I often find myself brewing a warm pot of tea to accompany me through the day. Spoonfuls of beautiful dried herbs, fragrant and colorful, say their hellos to me as I measure them into the pot. Easily measured out with my trusty spoon, it only takes a moment or two to get my tea going before I am called forth to the rest of the day.

There are few different recipes I call upon each morning for my daily brew, and I always measure out my herbs simply and quickly in “parts” using my spoon. Using parts in herbal recipes as a measurement is an old way of measuring herbs that is referred to as the Simpler’s Method. It is indeed simple and extremely versatile!

“I am one of those people who gets frustrated with exact proportions. Coffee mugs are most often my measuring cups, and spoons from my silverware drawer serve as measuring spoons” (Gladstar, 2008, pg. 378).

What is A “Part” Anyway?

Parts are one way that herbalists talk about measurements. A “part” is any form of measurement used to dole out the ingredients in a given recipe. Parts in herbal recipes can be measured out in by volume or by weight, though volume is perhaps the most common measurement used among herbalists. Weight measurements include ounces, pounds, and grams, while volume measurements include cups, tablespoons, and teaspoons. You simply choose the measurement you want to use and stick to that measurement through the recipe. Often herbalists will use what is at hand to measure their ingredients. Parts in herbal recipes measured out with a spoon that is on hand or favorite mug or even a bowl makes it fast and easy to whip up your herbal brews.  

Many herbalists provide their recipes in parts allowing great flexibility for the person creating the recipe. Bigger or smaller measurements can easily be used to create large amounts of the herbal preparation or small amounts based on the need. This makes it unnecessary to multiply teaspoons to see how many are in a cup or convert the weight of an ounce of herbs to a volume measurement. Sometimes herbalists will also provide a recipe in parts that can be made in a variety of ways such as an infusion, a syrup, or even a tincture.

Measurement 3 parts 2 parts 1 part ½ part
teaspoon 3 teaspoons 2 teaspoons 1 teaspoon ½ teaspoons
tablespoon 3 tablespoons 2 tablespoons 1 tablespoon ½ tablespoon
cup 3 cups 2 cups 1 cup ½ cups
gram 3 grams 2 grams 1 gram ½ gram
ounce 3 ounces 2 ounces 1 ounce ½ ounces
pound 3 pounds 2 pounds 1 pound ½ pound

What Exactly Are “Parts” in Herbal Recipes? | Herbal Academy | Using parts in herbal recipes as a measurement really is a simple way to enjoy herbs, allowing for flexibility and ease in herbal crafting!

An Example of Parts in Herbal Recipes

Let’s say you are making a tea recipe that is given in parts such as, 2 parts lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), 1 part spearmint (Mentha spicata), ½ part rose petals (Rosa spp.).

You could brew up one big cup of tea to enjoy from this recipe by using a teaspoon as the part, for example:

2 teaspoons lemon balm
1 teaspoon spearmint
½ teaspoon rose petals

Or you could mix together a large quantity of these herbs to make a dried tea blend to share with friends or have set aside to enjoy in the future using cups as your measurement:

2 cups lemon balm
1 cup spearmint
½ cup rose petals

You could apply this same concept using ounces by weight as the measurement:

2 ounces lemon balm
1 ounce spearmint
½ ounce rose petals

Using parts in herbal recipes as a measurement really is a simple way to enjoy herbs, allowing for flexibility and ease in herbal crafting! And now that you know how to make recipes with parts as the given measurement, it is time to get busy whipping up some herbal preparations!

Learn the basics for many beloved herbal remedies in these posts from the Academy blog:

Are you interested in studying herbalism? The Herbal Academy offers affordable, high-quality education for herbalists from the very beginning level to advanced! Visit our course page to learn more.

What Exactly Are “Parts” in Herbal Recipes? | Herbal Academy | Using parts in herbal recipes as a measurement really is a simple way to enjoy herbs, allowing for flexibility and ease in herbal crafting!

REFERENCES

Gladstar, R. (2008). Rosemary Gladstar’s herbal recipes for vibrant health. North Adams, MA: Storey Books.

Vegan Herb And Veggie Stew

Vegan Herb and Veggie Stew | Herbal Academy | Nothing says warming and comforting like a big bowl of stew! Your family will love this hearty and nutritious Vegan Herb and Veggie Stew!

Because nothing says warming and comforting winter foods quite like a big, hearty bowl of stew. Yes, even vegan herb and veggie stew!

This plant-based soup is nutrient dense and loaded with beans, kale, herbs, and other seasonal winter veggies that will make any belly happy—especially after a long day of trekking around in the snow!

Not only is it delicious, but it provides nourishment in multiple forms. The beans provide a large dose of vegan protein, while the potatoes contain high amounts of potassium and fiber. Fresh parsley is known to have health-supporting and anti-inflammatory properties, as well as being high in iron. And of course, the kale is a nutritional powerhouse, loading the stew with vitamins A, C and K, fiber, antioxidants, and calcium.

However, the star ingredient of this recipe might be the lesser known nutritional yeast. It’s an extremely important staple for vegans and vegetarians to incorporate into their diet as it’s difficult to find other plant-based sources of vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 is crucial for optimal brain, bone, and nerve health. Nutritional yeast provides your daily required amount of B12 is just one tablespoon along with trace amounts of protein, zinc, and folate. It gives dishes a nutty, “cheesy” flavor and is a great addition to soups, sauces, pasta dishes, casseroles, or lasagnas as a Parmesan replacement. It gives this particular stew a cheesy, creamy consistency that really amps up the flavor factor.

Vegan Herb and Veggie Stew | Herbal Academy | Nothing says warming and comforting like a big bowl of stew! Your family will love this hearty and nutritious Vegan Herb and Veggie Stew!

Vegan Herb and Veggie Stew

This stew comes together effortlessly, even on a busy weeknight, and is easily substituted with other veggies like zucchini, spinach, peas, or green beans. It freezes well and is fairly budget-friendly, making it a great choice for busy families who have a lot of mouths to feed.

Cozy up with this stew all winter long and enjoy all the delicious health benefits it has to offer!

Vegan Herb And Veggie Stew

[recipe_ingredients]

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large yellow onion, chopped
2 cups sliced carrots
1 cup chopped celery
3 cups cubed red potatoes
3 cups chopped curly kale
1/3 cup nutritional yeast
2 tablespoons dried rosemary
3 teaspoons dried thyme
1 1/2 teaspoons garlic powder
1 teaspoon all-purpose seasoning
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
2 cups organic cannellini beans
6 cups organic vegetable broth
Sea salt and black pepper to taste
1 cup cooked brown rice pasta (optional)

[/recipe_ingredients]

[recipe_directions]

  • Saute onions in olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat for about 10 minutes
  • Add carrots and celery and cook for five more minutes
  • Add potatoes, kale, nutritional yeast, rosemary, thyme, garlic powder and all-purpose seasoning and stir well to combine for a few additional minutes
  • Add parsley, beans, broth, salt and black pepper and bring to a boil
  • Once boiling, reduce to low heat and simmer for 20 minutes
  • Add pasta once cooked, if using

[/recipe_directions]

You can find more healthy recipes on the Herbal Academy blog in our “Eat Well” category. Check them out today!

Vegan Herb and Veggie Stew | Herbal Academy | Nothing says warming and comforting like a big bowl of stew! Your family will love this hearty and nutritious Vegan Herb and Veggie Stew!

How To Make Immune Stimulating Elderberry Syrup

How To Make Immune Stimulating Elderberry Syrup | Herbal Academy | Cold and flu viruses are everywhere! Learn how this immune stimulating remedy can come to your aid.

Holy shi…………itake! We are being invaded by cold and flu viruses! But, that doesn’t mean that we are helpless. Instead, we can use simple herbal remedies, such as an immune stimulating elderberry syrup, to support our bodies as they resist viral pathogens like the common cold and flu virus.

First of all, no one has time to be sick, but unfortunately, sickness happens to us all. Don’t you think it would be nice to support your body using natural herbal remedies when you’re sick so your body can get back to its natural state of health, faster?

Of course it would!

This is where traditional remedies like immune stimulating elderberry syrup come into play.

Your Time Is Valuable

According to the Centers for Disease Control, cold and flu season is upon us, with flu season peaking anytime between December and March (Summary of the 2015-2016 Influenza Season, 2016).

With work, school, family, and many other responsibilities on your shoulders, getting sick simply feels like another “to-do”… one you don’t have time for.

In the United States, children miss close to 22 million days of school and 20 million missed days of work by adultsand that’s just for colds alone (Pappas, n.d.)!

Seeing how you have things to do, your time is valuable. This is why it’s important to take care of your body, especially during times when you are more susceptible to pathogens, such as cold and flu season.

How To Make Immune Stimulating Elderberry Syrup | Herbal Academy | Cold and flu viruses are everywhere! Learn how this immune stimulating remedy can come to your aid.

Prevention Is The First Step

Prevention is the first step to doing what you can to keep from getting sick.

First, making sure you’re eating a healthy diet is key.

You want to fill your diet with food full of nutrients and plenty of antioxidants so your body is functioning well. Try to cut down on foods that cause inflammation and suppress the immune system such as too much gluten (if you are sensitive) or sugar.

Next, practice good hygiene.

Do your best to make sure you wash your hands using soap and water often. In fact, studies have shown that washing hands decreases the chance of getting a respiratory infection by 16-21% and reduces the chance of getting a gastrointestinal infection by 31% (Aiello et al., 2006; Rabie & Curtis, 2006)!

If you find yourself in a situation where hand washing isn’t an option, try using a homemade hand sanitizer instead.

Lastly, incorporate immunomodulating herbs into your diet.

Immunomodulating herbs are those that are capable of modifying or regulating immune function (Hoffmann, 2003).

Some examples of immunomodulating herbs are ashwagandha, cordyceps, eleuthero, holy basil, licorice, reishi mushrooms, among others (Winston & Maimes, 2007).

These herbs are often taken in capsule or tea form over long periods of time.

When Sickness Comes Your Way

The world is not a perfect place. Pathogens, like cold and flu viruses, do exist, and people do get sick.

Cold and flu virus symptoms are said to last around a week, but this can depend on the strain of virus you get and how healthy you are to begin with.

Thankfully, when you do come down with a virus, you can incorporate antimicrobial and immune stimulating herbs into your daily routine for your benefit.

Start with Antimicrobial Spices

As soon as you start feeling poorly, consider adding more spices into your diet. Many spices, especially the pungent ones, are classified as antimicrobials.

Herbalist David Hoffmann says, “Antimicrobials help the body destroy or resist pathogenic microorganisms. They help the body strengthen its own resistance to infective organisms and throw off the illness” (Hoffmann, 2003, pg. 244).

Two great spices to start with when you first become sick are ginger and garlic. Both have antimicrobial properties, and may help your body recuperate more quickly.

Add in Immune Stimulating Herbs Next

Immune stimulating herbs differ from immunomodulating herbs in that they stimulate immune function in a very non-specific way. They are often short acting and need to be taken at regular, frequent intervals (Hoffmann, 2003).

Immune Stimulating Elderberry Syrup

A great immune stimulating herbal remedy that can be used frequently as soon as a cold strikes is this recipe for Quick and Simple Elderberry Cold Syrupone of the hundreds of recipes included in our online Intermediate Herbal Course.

Elderberry is the star of this remedy as it has many beneficial uses for the onset of colds and the flu. This remedy tastes great and can be used for adults and children alike (please use maple syrup instead of honey for children under 1 year of age).

How To Make Immune Stimulating Elderberry Syrup | Herbal Academy | Cold and flu viruses are everywhere! Learn how this immune stimulating remedy can come to your aid.

Quick and Simple Elderberry Cold Syrup

[recipe_ingredients]

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  • Bring berries and water to a boil and then simmer for 30 minutes.
  • Strain berries and return liquid to the heat.
  • Add 1/4 ounce grated ginger and a handful of cloves.
  • Simmer gently for another 45-60 minutes, or until 2-3 cups of liquid remains.
  • Remove liquid from the heat, allow to cool to room temp.
  • Stir in 1 1/2 cups of raw honey.
  • Bottle, label, and refrigerate.

Suggested Use:

Take 2 teaspoons every 3 hours at the first sign of a virus invasion.

[/recipe_directions]

Learn even more about caring for your immune system, balancing health, and preparing remedies for cold and flu season in our Introductory Herbal Course. You’ll get an entire unit devoted to common discomforts like colds and the flu and how to use herbs to maintain balance in these situations.
See what people are saying about this course and sample a free lesson right here!

How To Make Immune Stimulating Elderberry Syrup | Herbal Academy | Cold and flu viruses are everywhere! Learn how this immune stimulating remedy can come to your aid.

REFERENCES

Aiello, A. E., Coulborn, R. M., Perez, V., & Larson, E. L. (2008). Effect of hand hygiene on infectious disease risk in the community setting: a meta-analysis. American journal of public health, 98(8), 1372-1381.

Hoffmann, D. (2003). Medical herbalism: The science and practice of herbal medicine. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press.

Pappas, D., MD. (n.d.). Patient education: The common cold in children (Beyond the Basics). Retrieved November 15, 2016, from http://www.uptodate.com/contents/the-common-cold-in-children-beyond-the-basics

Rabie, T., & Curtis, V. (2006). Handwashing and risk of respiratory infections: a quantitative systematic review. Tropical medicine & international health, 11(3), 258-267.

Summary of the 2015-2016 Influenza Season. (2016). Retrieved November 15, 2016, from http://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season-2015-2016.htm

Winston, D., & Maimes, S. (2007). Adaptogens: Herbs for strength, stamina, and stress relief. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press.

Post originally published November 13, 2013. Updated November 23, 2016.

Get Cooking With Herbs! (Family Herbal Summer Series: Part 6)

Get Cooking With Herbs (Family Herbal Summer Series: Part 6) | Herbal Academy | Cooking with herbs is a wonderful way to add the nutritional benefits of herbs to common foods that your family may already enjoy, come learn more!

Welcome to the last week of our Family Herbal Summer Series! It has been quite an adventure so far and I am excited to share this last part of our journey. This week is all about something that most of us love dearly—tasty food! Cultures around the world enhance both the flavor and health of their food by cooking with herbs. You, too, can bring herbs into your kitchen and to your family’s table each and every day.

Get Cooking With Herbs

Cooking with herbs is a wonderful way to add the nutritional benefits of herbs to common foods that your family may already enjoy. Most herbs are chock full of antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals as well as offering useful herbal actions, making it well worth the effort to enjoy herbs in food! In Herbs Are Tasty from the Introduction to Herbs for Kids series you will find a guide full of tips and tricks for incorporating herbs into every meal of the day plus a handy printable chart sharing plenty of fun ways to cook with herbs to keep in your refrigerator for daily inspiration.

Please be sure to share your tasty herbal culinary adventures with us on Instagram! Simply tag your photos with #HAFamilyHerbalSummerSeries so we can join in the fun with you!

Get Cooking With Herbs (Family Herbal Summer Series: Part 6) | Herbal Academy | Cooking with herbs is a wonderful way to add the nutritional benefits of herbs to common foods that your family may already enjoy, come learn more!

What’s for Breakfast?

Offering a wholesome breakfast to the family is a great way to get the day started off right. You can make it extra healthy and tasty by adding herbs to your dishes. Saute veggies for a breakfast scramble with turmeric, garlic, ginger, thyme, oregano, and more. Sprinkle a little cinnamon and cardamom on your toast or oatmeal. Here are some tasty recipes that boast a big kick from herbs for you to enjoy. Get the kiddos in the kitchen tomorrow morning and whip up a batch of something tasty together!

In the height of summer, fresh produce abounds which makes it the perfect time to enjoy a tasty and light fruit salad for breakfast. Challenge your family to eat a rainbow with this Magical Rainbow Fruit Salad With Herbs & Flowers. It is really fun to create with kids. Lay it out as a full, beautiful rainbow or mix it up in a bowl. Either way, be sure to enjoy this while the weather is warm and produce is abundant!

When my children were very small, we loved to make granola together. There is something about the measuring, pouring, and mixing required to make a batch of granola that they just loved. Granola is also a flexible food to create and offers children a chance to include things they love in the mix be it a favorite nut, dried fruit, or even some dark chocolate chips. This Herbalicious Homemade Granola recipe has plenty of tasty goodie ideas for kids to choose from plus a big herbal boost from powdered herbs added in before baking.

Whip up a batch of tasty breakfast baked goods and make a few extras to have on hand during the week for breakfast and snacks.

  • If you have plenty of fresh lemon balm growing in your yard these Lemon Balm Lavender Scones are a great choice for enjoying some of that bounty from the garden. Get the kiddos outside to help you harvest fragrant lemon balm—what a great way to start off the day!
  • Throw a handful of Calendula petals into the batter of these delicious Zucchini Summer Squash Chocolate Chip Muffins before baking to give them a little herbal lift.
  • Enjoy the tasty sweet spice of cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice in some Bran and Buckwheat Muffins!

Have you ever added herbs to a smoothie? If not, you are in for a treat! Blend up a tasty herbal smoothie for breakfast on a warm summer day or when your family is busy and on the go. These 3 Go-To Herbal Smoothies use nutritive herbal infusions in a liquid component of the recipe, which is pretty smart! You can also find ways to enjoy adding fresh herbs to smoothies including basil. It might sound weird, but trust me it is delicious! Try a Blackberry Basil Bliss Smoothie or enjoy experimenting with both fresh mint and basil in your breakfast smoothie!

Get Cooking With Herbs (Family Herbal Summer Series: Part 6) | Herbal Academy | Cooking with herbs is a wonderful way to add the nutritional benefits of herbs to common foods that your family may already enjoy, come learn more!

Savory Bites

Guacamole and pesto are two delicious food items that readily adapt to a wide variety of herbs. As a bonus, most kids love making and eating both of these as a dip or topping!

Guacamole is a favorite around our house. My kids love to use a potato masher when smashing up the avocado. Gather up the savory herbs from your garden and toss them in! We enjoy using a mix of chives including the blossoms, cilantro, basil, thyme, oregano, parsley, arugula, and nasturtium flowers.

Bountiful Herb Guacamole

[recipe_ingredients]

2 medium sized avocados
½ to 1 cup of fresh chopped herbs, depending on how herbie you want it!
1 to 4 cloves fresh garlic, depending on how much garlic your family will enjoy
1 fresh lime, juiced
Salt to taste

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  • Start making your guacamole by mincing up the garlic. Add a nice, big pinch of salt to the garlic during mincing to help hasten the breakdown of the garlic. Set aside.
  • Work with your kids to remove stems from your herbs, wash, and chop.
  • Cut the avocados in half and twist to open. Remove the seed and slide a spoon around the inside of the rind to loosen the flesh of the avocado. Place this is a nice shallow bowl or on a big plate.
  • Using a potato masher or a fork smash up the avocado until smooth. This is a super fun job for kids. So let them help you out and plan to be patient while they happily smash away for a bit.
  • Next add the herbs, the lime juice, and enough garlic to appease your child. If you like more garlic in your guacamole, set aside extra and add to your portion only.
  • Smash everything up together and salt to taste.
  • Enjoy with fresh chopped veggies, crackers, or your favorite dish!

[/recipe_directions]

Get Cooking With Herbs (Family Herbal Summer Series: Part 6) | Herbal Academy | Cooking with herbs is a wonderful way to add the nutritional benefits of herbs to common foods that your family may already enjoy, come learn more!

Pesto offers one of the simplest and tastiest ways to bring a variety of herbs onto the family table. A basic pesto recipe can be made with more than just basil lending itself well to the incorporation of many different herbs and leafy greens, like in this Delicious Beet Greens And Spinach Pesto Recipe. Of course, the greens and herbs you choose to use will affect the flavor of the pesto, so don’t be surprised! The basic recipe includes using nuts, olive oil, garlic, and salt to make up a tasty dip or topping for pizza, veggies, or pasta.

Fresh Herbs & Greens for Pesto

Basil Spinach**
Catnip Beet greens**
Cilantro Arugula
Nettle, blanch to remove the sting Lamb’s quarters
Parsley Kale & Chard**
Oregano* Chickweed
Mint* Spring dandelion greens
Sage*

*Use in small amounts

**Blanch these tougher greens in boiling water

Make Your Own Pesto

Experiment with the ratios in this recipe as well as the different choices for leafy greens and nuts to find your favorite pesto combinations!

[recipe_ingredients]

1/3 cup of nuts such as pine nuts, almonds, walnuts, pistachios, and pecans
2 cloves of garlic
4 cups of loosely packed fresh herb and green leaves. Use a combination for a depth of flavor
Juice of 1/2 a lemon
Olive oil
Salt
Parmesan cheese, optional

[/recipe_ingredients][recipe_directions]

  • Combine the nuts and garlic in a food processor and process until ground.
  • Add the greens and lemon juice.
  • Process the greens and lemon juice while you begin drizzling in the olive oil until the pesto begins to loosen and it is the texture you want.
  • Add optional Parmesan cheese
  • Salt to taste and enjoy!

[/recipe_directions]

Get Cooking With Herbs (Family Herbal Summer Series: Part 6) | Herbal Academy | Cooking with herbs is a wonderful way to add the nutritional benefits of herbs to common foods that your family may already enjoy, come learn more!

Special Herb Filled Snacks & Treats

Kids often need a little something to tide them over between meals. When cooking with herbs you can create healthful snacks and treats together to keep little tummies with an herbal boost until the next meal.

Learn how to make a chai spiced adaptogen powder to help you create Herbal Infused Snacks on the Go such as delicious herb-infused energy bites or even pudding! Or enjoy offering the goodness of herbs in a yummy Herbal Jello from the Nerdy Farm Wife. You can also make jello extra special by gathering your own dandelion flowers for this Dandelion Gelatin from the Homestead Lady.

Frozen Delights for Hot Summer Days

Who doesn’t love cooling down with something special and delicious on a hot summer day? A favorite way of herbalists to offer herbs to kids is with a tasty herbal ice pop! Homemade with a mix of infusions and fresh fruit, herbal ice pops are a hydrating, nourishing snack. You can blend up almost any child-friendly tea with fruit to make your own ice pops or enjoy this tasty High-C Herbal Ice Pop!

Another perennial summertime favorite is creamy, cold ice cream. Herbs are right at home in ice cream!

 

Tips on Balancing the Heart Chakra | Herbal Academy | Learn what the heart chakra is and tips on how to balance it with herbs and nature.

Tasty Herbal Baked Goodies

Do your children love to bake? Mine do! And sometimes it seems like there is no better way to get my children in the kitchen with me than to bake up something tasty together. Baking with herbs can be as simple as adding a couple of teaspoons of cinnamon to a batch of muffins or using big quantities of fresh herbs such as in the fresh mint cookies with dark chocolate found here. You can also use herbs to decorate your baked goods and make them lovely to look at. My children often devote themselves to cake decorating with beautiful flowers as much as they would to any piece of art they are involved in creating. So the next time you bake something, try tossing in a few teaspoons of a ground spice you have on hand or even a cup full of fresh herbs!

You can also use herbs to decorate your baked goods and make them lovely to look at. My children often devote themselves to cake decorating with beautiful flowers as much as they would to any piece of art they are involved in creating. So the next time you bake something, try tossing in a few teaspoons of a ground spice you have on hand or even a cup full of fresh herbs!

Herbs for Baking

Sweet Savory Decoration
Rose petals Thyme Pansies & violets
Calendula petals Sage Roses
Red clover blossoms Rosemary Calendula
Dandelion flowers Garlic Lemon balm leaves
Lemon balm Nettle Mint leaves
Mints Oregano Dandelion flowers
Cinnamon Dandelion Cinnamon powder
Clove Red clover Nasturtium flowers
Allspice Turmeric

Get Cooking With Herbs (Family Herbal Summer Series: Part 6) | Herbal Academy | Cooking with herbs is a wonderful way to add the nutritional benefits of herbs to common foods that your family may already enjoy, come learn more!

Yummy Drinks to Enjoy

What better way to enjoy the tastiness and benefits of herbs than in a delicious drink? Herbs lend themselves easily to all kinds of beverages. Water works wonderfully in extracting constituents from plants including vitamins and minerals. This means that making herbal drinks brings nutrition and the goodness of herbs right into your family’s teapot or lemonade pitcher.

Cooling Drinks for Summertime

Speaking of lemonade, did you know that you can use a variety of herbs in lemonade? Rose petals and hips, raspberry, nettle, chamomile, elder flowers, and even garlic (find a recipe for garlic lemonade here) are a few herbs that work well in lemonade. This recipe for delightfully purple Violet Lemonade will give you the instructions you need to make your own creations such as substituting the herb of your choice for the violet flower and leaves. Use less quantity of herb if you are using dried herbs as they are more concentrated.

Herbal iced teas are also a pure delight during the summer. Whip up a batch of Family-Friendly Herbal Chai and serve it cold over ice for a tasty treat. Or find a recipe for a delicious sour and flowery cooling iced tea here. If your family loves coconut and vanilla, try making some Vanilla Coconut Kefir with this recipe from the Little Herbal. You can even blend the kefir with some fruit and freeze into tasty ice pops! And don’t forget to enjoy a smoothie or two for a refreshing drink on a hot day!

Get Cooking With Herbs (Family Herbal Summer Series: Part 6) | Herbal Academy | Cooking with herbs is a wonderful way to add the nutritional benefits of herbs to common foods that your family may already enjoy, come learn more!

Warm & Tasty Comfort Drinks

A warm cup of tea offers so much comfort, and making it for others is like an act of love. My kids often ask for a cup of tea after a long, hard day or before bedtime. They have their own special tea cups to drink from and even their own small teapots which they adore using!

  • Help your child find teas they will love to drink by hosting a little tea party for your family or even for your child’s friends! Tea Tasting & MYO Herbal Tea for Kids from Mama Rosemary will give you all the information you need to enjoy exploring herbal teas together.
  • If you are looking for a tea recipe that is all ready for you to enjoy, check out this delicious recipe for Sweet Vitamin C Rosehip Tea from the Homestead Lady.
  • This Soothing Sani-Tea is perfect for fractious parents and kiddos alike offered by Prairie Herbcraft.

Other warm beverages include the well-loved cup of cocoa. You can add herbs such as rose, mint, or cinnamon to your cocoa to make it even more delicious and wonderful. Check out this yummy Real Peppermint Hot Cacao recipe! Another favorite hot beverage for children is hot apple cider. The addition of herbs makes this a wonderful healthful drink. Find a family-friendly recipe here.

Get Cooking With Herbs (Family Herbal Summer Series: Part 6) | Herbal Academy | Cooking with herbs is a wonderful way to add the nutritional benefits of herbs to common foods that your family may already enjoy, come learn more!

I hope you found something tasty and new to make with your family this week! If you are looking for more healthy eating ideas chock full of the goodness of herbs, visit the Eat Well section of the Academy blog where you will find oodles of inspiring recipes as well as tips and trick to make healthy eating easy and fun.

Thank you so much for joining us during the Family Herbal Summer Series. We sure hope you and your family had fun during our herbal adventure and that you learned a little something along the way. You can enjoy the whole series here!

Week 6 Recap & Action Plan

  1. Make an herb filled breakfast
  2. Enjoy some guacamole or pesto or both!
  3. Try your hand at making an herbal treat such as ice cream, ice pops, or a delicious baked good.
  4. Share an herbal drink together as a family – hot or cold, it’s up to you!
  5. Show us your yummy creations on Instagram using hashtag #HAFamilyHerbalSummerSeries!

Stocking the Family Herb Cabinet (Family Herbal Summer Series: Part 4)

Stocking the Family Herb Cabinet (Family Herbal Summer Series: Part 4) | Herbal Academy | Stock your family herb cabinet with remedies you make together! Also enjoy using simples as a family.

Welcome back to the Family Herbal Summer Series at the Herbal Academy! I am so happy you and your family are here to join us for our fourth week of camp. This week during our Family Herbal Summer Series we are going to get crafty and enjoy making some wonderful herbal preparations to stock the family herb cabinet such as salves, syrups, herbal infusions, and more! We will also talk about approaching herbs in a simple way that is learning about one herb at a time.

While we craft together, be sure to share your family’s herbal creations with us on Instagram by using hashtag #HAFamilyHerbalSummerSeries. We love seeing all the wonderful things you are making!

If you have missed any of our adventures so far, join us the Family Herbal Summer Series to follow along!

Continue reading “Stocking the Family Herb Cabinet (Family Herbal Summer Series: Part 4)”